Neck Pain Relief from a Single Chiropractic Session

Research has repeatedly shown the efficacy of chiropractic for neck pain, but many of our patients want to know how soon to expect improvement. Results may vary depending on numerous factors. However, we have found that many of our patients have immediate benefits after a single session at our office.

In a 2008 literature review, researchers sought the extent of a single session of manual therapy achieves in reducing neck pain. They confirmed what we have also noticed with our Aloha/Beaverton patients: even a single spinal adjustment can indeed improve neck pain in many patients.

Their systematic review analyzed the existing research on changes in pain scores in patients with chronic pain in randomized clinical trials involving a single session of manual therapy. Researchers identified nine relevant research trials. Six studies involved spinal manipulation, four studies involved spinal mobilization or non-manipulative manual therapy, and one study used manual trigger point therapy.

The researchers found that the reviewed research reflects moderate to high evidence that immediate, clinically significant improvements can be seen after a single session of spinal adjustments. The average change in pain score was -18.9.

The trials involving spinal manipulation, like the techniques we employ at First Choice Chiropractic and Rehabilitation, were found to be the most effective conservative neck pain treatments in the study. Spinal adjustments decreased the pain scores of patients more than any other treatment options studied.

Neck pain is just one of the many conditions we help our patients overcome at First Choice Chiropractic and Rehabilitation in Aloha/ Beaverton. We us evidence-based chiropractic and physical therapies to provide lasting neck pain relief.

Reference

Vernon H, Humphreys BK. Chronic mechanical neck pain in adults treated by manual therapy: a systemic review of change scores in randomized controlled trials of a single session. The Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy 2008; 16(2): E42–E52.

June 10, 2013
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Sunita Bhasin