Chiropractic + Physical Therapy = Back Pain Relief

It is estimated that 60%-80% of people will experience low-back pain at least once in their lives. Doctors often recommend that patients actively exercise to help alleviate their symptoms. But many patients understandably avoid doing so because of their pain.

Research shows that chiropractic care can help in this regard. In a recent study, adjustments from a chiropractor helped patients achieve immediate pain relief, which enhanced the benefits of exercise and improved their back pain.

Researchers divided participants into two groups. The first group of patients received chiropractic spinal adjustments followed immediately by physical-therapy exercises. For comparative analysis, another group of patients received a placebo or "sham" treatment of detuned ultrasound, followed by the same exercise. Both groups received eight treatments over four to eight weeks' time.

Pain intensity was measured both before and after each therapeutic session. The researchers also evaluated participants for disability, fear-avoidance behavior, and erector spinae and abdominal muscle endurance.

The patients who received spinal adjustments experienced an analgesic effect, immediately relieving their pain and improving the benefits of their exercise therapy. This group also had lower disability and overall pain levels. The authors of the study concluded that chiropractic manual therapy, immediately followed by exercise, induces a significant decrease in low-back pain.

So, if your doctor is telling you to exercise, but your back pain is preventing you from doing so, come see one of our chiropractors at First Choice Chiropractic and Rehabilitation in Aloha. Our team of physical therapists and chiropractors can get your body moving and ease your low-back pain now and in the future.

Reference

Balthazard P, et al. Manual therapy followed by specific active exercises versus a placebo followed by specific active exercises on the improvement of functional disability in patients with chronic non specific low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 2012; 13: 162. doi:10.1186/1471-2474-13-162.

April 29, 2013
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Sunita Bhasin